Play

Hosts: Chad Etzel, John Sextro and Darryl H. Thomas
Audio Engineer and Post-Producer: Darryl H. Thomas
Released Friday, February 20, 2015

Tweet Shoutouts

The Discussion

Open-Source Project of the Week

Picks

Chad

Darryl

Provides a really good summary of the changes in Swift 1.2 with a bonus section on how to implement CopyOnWrite collections using isUniquelyReferenced (as well as a plea to consider using ManagedBuffers instead).

John

  • InVision – turn your graphic mockups into a prototype.

Alternative show title suggestions

  • Violent agreement
  • Mmmm
  • Master stroke
  • Perilous
  • Dear Internet JS
  • Threading is hard
  • Panacea for Multithreading
  • Super Against It
  • Dogmatism
  • How Comprehensive
  • Maschetti Order
  • One other point
  • Log All the Things JS
  • No fighting here
  • Copy on assign
Play

Hosts: Chad Etzel, John Sextro and Darryl H. Thomas
Audio Engineer and Post-Producer: Darryl H. Thomas

Released Friday, February 6, 2015

Tweet Shoutouts

The Discussion

Continuous Delivery Challenges in Mobile Development

Open-Source Project of the Week

Spring (Written by Meng To, a self taught UI/UX developer living in San Francisco)
A library that can help you add animations to your app.

  • Written in Swift.
  • They have a demo app that lets you play with the animations.
  • Works with Storyboards as well.

Picks

Chad

Darryl

John

  • Battle of Brothers, The one year game dev duel. (from Ilea Cristian)
  • Herman Miller Living Office, great ideas for improving on the open-plan office space.

Alternative show title suggestions

  • No
  • Windows 3.1 Release
  • Anticipation
  • Discredit Tech Buzz
  • Boxed Software or Box Software
  • Gold Master
  • Maniacal Focus on Quality
  • Unit Test Hater
  • Bleeding Edge
  • Waiting is Terrible
  • Spoilers
Play

Hosts: John Sextro and Darryl H. Thomas
Audio Engineer and Post-Producer: Darryl H. Thomas

Released Friday, January 30, 2015

Tweet Shoutouts

The Discussion

SceneKit

For a discussion of Apple’s Metal Framework, see Episode 44

Here you go, Ilea, this one’s for you…

  • What is SceneKit?
    • Objective-C framework for building apps and games that use 3D graphics
    • High-performance rendering engine
    • High-level, descriptive API
    • Supports animation based on the Core Animation framework with defined animatable properties
    • Abstracts away the rendering algorithms used to display a scene, meaning you don’t need to worry about things like:
      • Object ordering
      • Culling
      • Shaders (though you can write your own if you like)
  • What is SceneKit not?
    • A game engine (you must provide your own logic)
    • An escape from linear algebra
    • Cross-platform (but who wants to support Android anyway?)
    • A fully-featured substitute for solutions like Unity3D
  • Why use SceneKit?
    • Very easy way to get your feet wet with 3D graphics
    • Suitable for simple games
    • Rapid implementation of visualization apps
  • Major features
    • Available on Mac OS X and iOS
    • Integrated inspection (model viewer, material editor, particle editor) and debugging in Xcode
    • COLLADA importing
    • Supports geometries, materials, lights and cameras
    • Animatable properties
    • LoD substitution (level-of-detail, allowing for variable geometry complexity)
    • Actions (allows for animation triggers, sound effects, etc)
    • Skinning and Deformations
    • Static/dynamic shadowing
    • Physics, including joints and inverse kinematics
    • Particles
    • Ray casting/hit testing
    • Custom OpenGL shader programs
    • JavaScriptCore bridging
    • SpriteKit overlays for performant 2D UI elements that don’t require an additional compositing pass
  • The basics (iOS-specific)
    • Assets are contained within a Scene Assets container in your Xcode project
    • Xcode performs optimizations at build-time (up-axis correction, vertex interleaving, PVRTC image format favoring, etc)
    • Scenes can be imported from COLLADA (in Xcode. The dae file is converted to a bplist [retaining the .dae extension] before it is put on the device) or un-archived from plists.
    • Scenes consist of a graph of nodes.
      • Root node: defines the world’s coordinate space
      • sub-Nodes: populate the world with visible content by attaching:
        • Cameras
        • Lights
        • Geometries
    • Scenes can be built-up (or modified after load) programmatically.
    • sub-Nodes from other scenes can be added to a scene, but a root node must not be added to another scene.
    • Important classes
      • SCNView – a view that displays SceneKit content
      • SCNScene – The container for all SceneKit content
      • SCNNode – The basic building block of a scene
      • SCNGeometry – A three-dimensional object that can be attached to a node. Also known as a mesh or model. SceneKit has several built-in primitives that can be used, or custom meshes can be imported or built from vertex data. Surface appearance is defined by materials attached to the geometry.
      • SCNMaterial – A reusable definition of surface appearance properties for an object
      • SCNLight – A light source that can be attached to a node, providing shading in the rendered scene
      • SCNCamera – A virtual camera that can be attached to a node, providing a point of view for rendering a scene.

Open-Source Project of the Week

  • iOS-8-SceneKit-Globe-Test – @schwa
    iOS 8 Scene Kit (swift!) project showing a spinning (earth) globe with diffuse, ambient, specular and normal materials. Also cloud layer. Yum.

Picks

John

Darryl 

Alternative show title suggestions

  • Shader writing
  • Lots of polygons
  • bones and joints
  • inverse kinematics
  • draw call, draw call, draw call
  • root node for the world
  • particle emitters
  • hold on to the root node
  • root node
  • the maths
  • skin is a reserved
  • not a geologist
  • camera bob
  • the one with the monkeys
Play

Hosts: John Sextro, Chad Etzel and Darryl H. Thomas
Special Guest: Nolan O’Brien
Audio Engineer and Post-Producer: Darryl H. Thomas

Released Friday, January 23, 2015

Tweet Shoutouts

The Discussion

Project Management Triangle

Project Management Triangle

  • Time Estimation and Deadlines for development projects/tasks
    • What are your techniques? Are they effective/accurate?
    • Estimating with a team vs. by yourself
    • If you’re doing UI work (w/ or w/o a designer) vs. non-UI work
    • How often do you reassess your estimation?
    • When do you admit that your estimation is wrong or you won’t make your deadline?
    • How to prioritize tasks when a deadline is looming and not everything will get done?

Open-Source Project of the Week

  • CocoaMarkdown – Markdown parsing and rendering in Objective-C

Picks

Nolan O’Brien

  • SimPholders 2.0
    • A rewrite of simpholders in Swift.  A tool for viewing your iOS Simulator folders, the apps installed and what was recently run.  Great tool now that Simulators are unreadable GUIDs.

Darryl 

  • NSHipster (Nate Cook) – JavaScriptCore
    A deep dive into using JSContext and related classes to evaluate JavaScript on iOS. Among the many use cases for JavaScriptCore is game scripting (although LUA is perhaps a more popular solution), which may come in handy for a future episode of iOhYes.

Chad

John

Alternative show title suggestions

  • Modus Operandi
  • Soto Brothers
  • Coding Soto Brothers
  • Fungibility
  • Wa-gile-fall
  • #vague tweets
  • Its “Super”
  • In and out triangle
  • Marty you’re not thinking 4th dimensionally
  • Gold master
  • Stamping CDs
  • Agreeing Snicker
  • I look up to you Chad
Play

Hosts: John Sextro, Chad Etzel and Darryl H. Thomas
Audio Engineer and Post-Producer: Darryl H. Thomas

Released Friday, January 16, 2015

Tweet Shoutouts

The Discussion

  • The Open-Office Trap published in the New Yorker, by Maria Konnikova
    • 1997 – The University of Calgary study (before, 4 weeks after and 6 months after)
      • Disruptive, stressful, cumbersome, dissatisfied, resentful
      • Productivity fell
    • 2005 Study
      • When workers couldn’t change the way that things looked, adjust the lighting and temperature, or choose how to conduct meetings, spirits plummeted.
    • johnsextro
      This article sounds like a bunch of crying from a pretentious primadonna http://t.co/x3jDzAerwC
    • Types of open floor plans
      • the blank slate – just tables and chairs
      • moveable walls – rolling or sliding walls/whiteboards used to create separation
      • Team Area / Pit / Bullpen – semi-private partitions, not easily reconfigured
  • John’s opinions
    • Cubicles, they suck
      • False sense of privacy
      • They don’t contain nor block noise
      • They get in the way and are a waste of space
    • Offices, slight better but still bad
      • They can contain and block noise
      • But they are a terribly inefficient use of space
      • Stifling to collaboration and fascist
  • Darryl’s opinions (read: facts)
    • Open floor plans, they suck
      • Amusing article (http://verynicewebsite.net/2015/01/be-yourself-as-long-as-its-your-best-self/)
      • Workers are left with no sense of personal space as a company grows
      • The universally proposed “solution” to noise is headphones, read: OTHER NOISE
      • People feel free to interrupt your workflow in person, as if IM and email wasn’t bad enough
      • Note: I think this actually works well for teams up to 10 quiet people (no phone calls, etc), beyond that, it’s untenable
      • My favored compromise solution: Bullpen cubes (cubes that can accommodate teams of 4-5 people)
    • Cubicles, I hated them until I no longer had them
      • I miss my partitions
      • Cubes actually do affect noise levels: they discourage yelling across the room and deflect and diffuse/absorb audio a bit (when built properly)
    • Shared offices, I love ‘em
      • Office with up to 3 occupants
      • Can get cramped, but with good office-mates, it’s pretty harmonious
      • Especially good if your office mate is always going to meetings (and you aren’t)

Open-Source Project of the Week

  • Sleipnir, BDD framework
    • Sleipnir is not dependent of NSObject
    • Sleipnir is not using XCTest

Picks

Darryl 

  • 30th Annual International Technology and Persons with Disabilities Conference (#csun15, San Diego, March 2-6, 2015)
    As the name implies, this is a conference related to technology and how we make it accessible to those with disabilities. I’ll be attending for the first time. Traditionally web-heavy, there are a few iOS-specific sessions this year in addition to several sessions that are universally useful regardless of platform.
    Early-bird registration ($455) ends February 3, 2015

Chad

John

  • Ninjevade – developed by a friend of mine, Matt Burton. He just recently released it to iTunes.

Alternative show title suggestions

  • Rail against the environment
  • Bullpen
  • 5by5
  • Code of Conduct
  • Rage coding
  • Do that thing
  • You and your damn physics
  • There was a ‘B’ somewhere
  • Those germs can move
Play

Hosts: Jason Kozemczak, John Sextro and Chad Etzel
Audio Engineer and Post-Producer: John Sextro

Released Friday, January 9, 2015

Tweet Shoutouts

The Discussion

  • Farewell to Jason
    • Chad’s story
    • John’s story
  • How to get started as an iOS app developer today

Open-Source Project of the Week

  • Design Patterns in Swift
    • Includes behavioral, creational and structural patterns
    • Includes an example implementation of each pattern and then how to use the code implemented via the pattern.

Picks

Jason

Chad Follow

John Sextro 

Alternative show title suggestions

  • Farewell Jason
  • Dubius Introduction
  • Insane in all the right ways – ce
  • That’s Chad
  • Twitter Arguments
  • Calling HR
  • One new thing

 

Play

Hosts: Jason Kozemczak, Darryl H. Thomas and John Sextro
Special Guest: Javier Soto
Audio Engineer and Post-Producer: Darryl H. Thomas

Released Friday, December 12, 2014

Tweet Shoutouts

The Discussion

  • WatchKit / Pebble
    • WatchKit design decisions: code runs in the phone, not on the watch. API is synchronous, but with no getters.
    • The big success of WatchKit is making the API transport-agnostic: no mention of Bluetooth.
      • It may even use Ad-Hoc Wifi to send larger amounts of data.
    • General confusion around the limitations of WatchKit:
      • It’s NOT the API to make watch apps, but a way to extend iOS apps by “projecting” data to the watch.
      • Native apps coming later.
    • A win of making watch apps extensions is that, at least for now, the user doesn’t need to manage which apps you install on the watch, eliminating one of the frictions of the Pebble.
      • Another consequence is it eliminates the need to log into apps separately for the watch, like you have to do with Pebble apps.
      • Apple needs to get App Store discovery right.
    • beta 2 released today (Dec. 10); API changes in 8.2b2
      • [WKInterfaceController +openParentApplication:reply:]
      • [UIApplicationDelegate -application:handleWatchKitExtensionRequest:reply:]
        • From the docs: “A dictionary containing data to return to the WatchKit app. The contents of the dictionary must be serializable to a property list file. The contents of this dictionary are at your discretion and you may specify nil.” (emphasis our own)
      • Default row appearance in WKInterfaceTable, which can be overridden by specifying bg color, margin, corner radius and height in IB
      • Blog post by _DavidSmith
    • Lister example app updated today w/ Watch extension (app and glance)

Open-Source Project of the Week

Picks

Jason

  • Bobler, a micro-podcasts app (Instagram for audio?) follow Jason (@jak_)

Darryl 

  • Build Phase, a weekly technical podcast discussing iOS development and design. Hosted by Thoughtbot developers Mark Adams and Gordon Fontenot. Lots of discussions related to TDD, architectural design and an exploration of functional programming with Swift.

Javier Soto 

  • MMWormhole, a clever cross-process message passing implementation

John Sextro 

Alternative show title suggestions

  • Burrito Soto
  • Thanks Chad
  • “Is that French?”
  • Feed your feed
  • Feed you podcast fever
  • “Underscore? That’s a cool name”
Play

Hosts: Jason Kozemczak, Darryl H. Thomas and Chad
Audio Engineer and Post-Producer: Darryl H. Thomas

Released Friday, December 5, 2014

Tweet Shoutouts

The Discussion

  • Super
    • Implementation
    • UI Design/effects
    • Custom components
    • Tests

Open-Source Project of the Week

ZLSwipeableView – https://github.com/zhxnlai/ZLSwipeableView

  • Interesting example of ui dynamics in action with a good readme and a good delegate protocol

Picks

Jason

Darryl 

  • Tom Harrington – Sharing data between iOS apps and app extensions
    Overview of file-based data sharing. When I originally read this article and marked it as pick-worthy, there was considerably more information about how to use file coordination as a notification mechanism between apps and extensions. It turns out, Apple has specifically warned against using file coordination in extensions (Tech note 2408). The article has been updated accordingly.

Chad Etzel 

Alternative show title suggestions

  • The Floodgate of Nerd Hatred
  • Gesture Privilege
  • Crazy Chess Game
  • Snow iOS
Play

Hosts: Jason Kozemczak, Darryl H. Thomas and John Sextro
Special Guest: Dave Bellano @davidbellona
Audio Engineer and Post-Producer: Darryl H. Thomas

Released Friday, November 21, 2014

Tweet Shoutouts

The Discussion

  • WatchKit has been released: we’ll cover this in-depth in a later episode, but let’s discuss initial reactions briefly.
  • Learning to program in Swift from a designer’s perspective
    • Why learn to program? (12 min)
      • Does learning to program help the designer communicate with engineers?
    • What is recommendation for mockups to other designers (18 min)
    • What approach are you taking?
    • Will this knowledge help you understand the trade offs between out of the box UI and custom? (28 min)
    • How do you deal with MVP demands in UI design? (38 min)
      • Key interactions
        • Base level functionality
        • UX
      • Closed loop system
      • Open loop system
    • What has been the most surprising aspect of learning Swift? (44 min)
    • Difference: learning Obj-C vs. Swift (47 min)
    • What pitfalls have you run into, and how have you overcome them?
    • How can we as engineers better communicate in terms a designer will relate to?

 Open-Source Project of the Week

A great open-source resource was my classmates work on Github. We had to submit work using Github and it quickly became a great resource for looking at other classmates’ code. If you search for “CodePath” and filter for Swift on Github, you’ll find many of the designer and engineering assignments for the Swift classes.

Picks

Jason

John 

Darryl 

  • Dash API Docs for iOS
    The API documentation you know and love from OS X is now available as an iOS app. Personally, I don’t find myself searching API docs on mobile devices all that frequently, but I see this as another way to support Bogdan Popescu’s efforts. I use the Mac app all the time.

Dave Bellona 

  • Matthew Sander’s iOS posts on animations, custom segues, and adaptive layouts in Swift. He’s a designer at Us Two, the firm that developed Monument Valley. Great resource for for beginners and intermediate designers who code.
  • Ivo Mynttinen’s iOS Design Guidelines is a solid breakdown of screen resolutions, design elements, and patterns on iOS 8.

Alternative show title suggestions

  • The why
  • Slow code
  • Modal Segue
  • Hidden behind the longpress
  • Farting out apps / Facebook farting out apps
  • Bourbon guy
  • Fix that redundancy
  • Red dots with white circles
  • Thank you Swift
  • Accent grave
  • Accent aigu
  • Obj-C for 2nd graders
Play

Hosts: Jason Kozemczak, Darryl H. Thomas, Chad Etzel and John Sextro
Audio Engineer and Post-Producer: Darryl H. Thomas

Released Friday, November 14, 2014

Tweet Shoutouts

The Discussion

  • TestFlight Beta Testing
    • Getting started
      • Xcode
      • iTunes Connect
    • Inviting Beta Testers
      • Internal vs. External
    • Does this mean that other beta testing services are “Sherlocked”?
      • HockeyApp, etc.
    • Should people using other beta testing tools migrate?
      • Are there advantages to being part of this ecosystem?
      • Are there advantages to staying away from TestFlight?
      • Does TestFlight give you anything special that you can’t get from another service?

 Open-Source Project of the Week

2048, An open source version of the game “2048”

git clone https://github.com/ik/2048.git

Is this damaging to the original developer of the game or does this follow the old adage, “There’s no such thing as bad publicity”

Darryl’s opinion:

  • Article on the “Threes ripped off by 1024, which is in turn ripped off by 2048” “controversy”: 2048’s Massive Popularity Triggers Cloning Controversy – Kotaku
  • At what point does a game define a new genre, which makes cloning inevitable? If game mechanics vary slightly, is that enough of a distinction? (I think so, but there are many who would consider the game mechanics to be every bit as much of the “art” as the game’s content.)

Jason’s opinion:

  • The market usually doesn’t care about fairness. Being an indie developer means running a business. Businesses must always be evolving to “put themselves out of business” or else your competitors or copycats will.

Picks

Jason

 

  • Dave Verwer’s iOS dev weekly
    • Weekly (obviously) curated iOS development videos / articles / stories
    • Sponsored job postings from great companies
    • Available by email (recommended) and the web

John 

  • Armchair – App Review Manager written in Swift for iOS and OS X
    • Similar to UAAppReviewManager and Appirater but 100% Swift, works on iOS and OS X
    • Prompts the user to rate your app only after passing the rules that you have established.
    • Very configurable

Chad 

Darryl 

Alternative show title suggestions

  • Cordial Cherry
  • Dr. Jak
  • Shut up
  • Break my own rule
  • Recused
  • Piecemeal solutions
  • Defining Genre
  • Autorelease pool
  • Leak out
  • Cascading Pool Draining